RUNNER JIVE's

About: (If you're here because I liked your selfie, it's because I resolved to like every selfie in 2014. I never want someone to feel what it's like to have a selfie unliked. Don't read into it)

thischarmingand:

like, in my defence, don’t tell me garlic bread isn’t at least a little aromantic.

it doesn’t want to love you, it just wants to make you fat. possibly happy. the last one is not a given.

image

I’m still thinking about this one, and if you think your embarrassment was bad, imagine my shame that I’m going to be pondering how garlic bread can be romantic for the next 24 hours. I’m a dweller about garlic bread-related thoughts.

I don’t think the “no thanks” link was supposed to be this empowering

tokyo-camera-style:

A video (0:49) of the Araki Nobuyoshi train- a rolling and functional exhibition of Araki’s photography that was part of the Setouchi Triennale, an art event in which twelve islands in Japan’s Seto Inland Sea hold every three years. 

video via Asahi Newspaper

Perhaps you’d prefer the special Nobuyoshi Araki room at the Dogo Onsen in Ehime? It’s part of the Dogo Onsen Art Festival 2014.  

More pictures and info here.

Next-level exhibitory locomotive photo-apparatus

(via kenyatta)

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?
Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.
So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”
All hands went up.
"How many of you want to make comics some day?"
Most of the hands went up.
Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”
Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”
"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.
She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”
That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.
It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.
The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?

Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.

So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”

All hands went up.

"How many of you want to make comics some day?"

Most of the hands went up.

Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”

Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”

"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.

She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”

That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.

It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.

The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

(via kenyatta)

thischarmingand:

the city where I live is in the middle of an extended heatwave (about 40 C at its worst) and my AC is not really designed for this so I have installed the unit in the smallest room of my apt with a window and basically cannot leave it unless I am leaving the house/want to die of heatstroke

moral: never move to the desert

moral 2: sitting around in your underwear isn’t any fun when it’s a necessity for survival

Been there! And I’m sorry you’re living it in this, of all, summers.

My first summer living in my grandfather’s old house (whose walls are made of lumber, chicken wire, and plaster) I had to keep refilling a 5-gallon bucket with cold water, and sitting with my feet in it. Window fans didn’t work, and I couldn’t afford an A/C. I tried just about everything, like freezing washcloths and putting them on my neck, but I’m such a furnace they’d just catch up to body heat temperature after 15 minutes and drip down all over me and just make it feel more humid (especially in underwear mode)

Have you thought about doing the duct tape/aluminum foil on the windows? I couldn’t do that the first summer, because I had a window fan in. But after that, even if it’s noisy, I’d never go without it again.

"Human beings don't have a right to water."

stfueverything:

Across the globe, Nestlé is pushing to privatize and control public water resources.

Nestlé’s Chairman of the Board, Peter Brabeck, has explained his philosophy with “The one opinion, which I think is extreme, is represented by the NGOs, who bang on about declaring water a public right. That means as a human being you should have a right to water. That’s an extreme solution.”

Since that quote has gotten widespread attention, Brabeck has backtracked, but his company has not. Around the world, Nestlé is bullying communities into giving up control of their water. It’s time we took a stand for public water sources.

Tell Nestlé that we have a right to water. Stop locking up our resources!

At the World Water Forum in 2000, Nestlé successfully lobbied to stop water from being declared a universal right — declaring open hunting season on our local water resources by the multinational corporations looking to control them. For Nestlé, this means billions of dollars in profits. For us, it means paying up to 2,000 percent more for drinking water because it comes from a plastic bottle.

Now, in countries around the world, Nestlé is promoting bottled water as a status symbol. As it pumps out fresh water at high volume, water tables lower and local wells become degraded. Safe water becomes a privilege only affordable for the wealthy.

In our story, clean water is a resource that should be available to all. It should be something we look after for the public good, to keep safe for generations, not something we pump out by billions of gallons to fuel short-term private profits. Nestlé thinks our opinion is “extreme”, but we have to make a stand for public resources. Please join us today in telling Nestlé that it’s not “extreme” to treat water like a public right.

Tell Nestlé to start treating water like a public right, not a source for private profits!

 
 
 

 
Sources and further reading:
Nestlé: The Global Search for Liquid Gold, Urban Times, June 11th, 2013
Bottled Water Costs 2000 Times As Much As Tap Water, Business Insider, July 12th, 2013
Peter Brabeck discussion his philosophy about water rights

I guess they got tired of all the baby formula scandals,wherein they convinced a bunch of mothers in third-world countries to buy an inferior product with money they didn’t have instead of using the superior, free product (breastmilk)
So now they’ll just do it with bottled water: Convince the world that bottled water is superior to free water, because there’s lots of third-world dollars to vacuum up out there.
Thanks for all the diabetes, obesity, and heart disease that your products have caused, too.

(via zalia)

kateoplis:

ecantwell:

Hey, guys.

It’s almost the weekend! And that means you’re probably wondering what you’re going to do. What friends to hang out with at brunch, what hikes to go on, which TV shows to watch on Sunday night. Game of Thrones is over for the season, Mad Men's over for the half-season, there's no more Breaking Bad, and you’re probably through season 2 of Orange is the New Black already. UGH SUNDAY TV WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO.

Well, there’s a show called Halt and Catch Fire on AMC at 10 pm that you’re probably not watching. I say this because if you were watching the ratings would probably be higher. The ratings are not very good.

I know this and can say this objectively because my husband is the co-creator, and we get the ratings every week, and every week we wish more people were tuning in. I think there are probably a handful of reasons for the low ratings, some of which are due to viewers choosing not to watch the show, and some of which are just a matter of timing and exposure. It’s summer, so people are out of town and in and out and DVRing stuff or just missing it. There have been good reviews, but since no one’s seen where the characters end up yet, it’s too easy to judge certain story lines before they’re given a chance to develop. It’s about computers, and there’s a guy who initially appears to be yet another boring alpha mystery dude, and honestly when Chris first told me the premise of the pilot I didn’t think it sounded like something I’d choose to watch if I didn’t know him.

But I’m asking you to give this show a chance. I’ve seen the whole season, and it’s blown me away. Friends of mine who were initially watching just because they knew it was Chris’s show and they thought they ought to watch out of friend duty have told me they were surprised by how invested they’ve become in the characters. The writers—who hail from Mad Men to The Sopranos to Southland—take Gordon and Donna and Joe and Cameron in directions you wouldn’t necessarily expect from the pilot. There are subversively intelligent people, and there are LGBT people, and there are women who wear pants, and there are men who cry, and there are people who try to be someone they’re not. (This scene, gorgeously gif-ed, is actually so very stunningly sad when you watch it in context.)

Rolling Stone (which, by the way, strongly disliked the majority of the first half of the season) called last week’s episode “42 minutes of solid, sometimes surprising, sometimes striking television, growing like that flower in Halt and Catch Fire’s heretofore sterile circuitry. Let it grow.” The Austin Chronicle lists five reasons you should be watching this season. The actors turn in fantastic performances—I have an especial soft spot for Toby Huss, who plays Joe’s boss with a fantastic combination of Texan charisma and subtlety. And, in this coming episode, Lee Pace delivers a particularly brave and lovely performance. 

Maybe you watched the pilot and thought it was okay but haven’t watched anything since. Maybe you’ve recorded the previous episodes on DVR and just haven’t gotten into them yet. Maybe you’re planning to binge it later. Maybe you didn’t DVR it at all—in which case, you can stream episodes for free on AMC’s website (all of them are still available for the next four days!) or purchase episodes on iTunes. Or maybe you don’t really give a shit about catching up, in which case I think you will LOVE this Sunday’s episode, which is one of my favorite episodes of the whole season. (BONUS: a Buffy veteran guest-stars. Start guessing.)

Anyway, if you have been even maybe possibly thinking about watching Halt and Catch Fire, it would be awesome if you tuned in now. I’d love for more people to love this show, and for the characters to get the chance to make you fall in love, and for the season to go out with more viewers than it came in with.

So. What are you doing this Sunday at 10 pm?

I’m completely hooked and so will you. Just watch it.

It’s basically pansexual(?) antihero Loki meets Fem!Mozart Ramones punk of early 80s BIOS code and

Ya know what? It’s comparable to every show mentioned above. I watch this so hard. Don’t be put off by the premise; speaking as a CompSci major, the tech portions of the show are minimal and are all explained in lay-terms within the plot dialogue(Even the phrase “Halt and Catch Fire”)

It’s just a truly unique and original show full of plot twists with hints you’ll never guess. Enjoy~

(via kenyatta)